HOA and Individual Insurance

No one ever thinks about insurance policies until an accident or injury happens. Then recovery and rebuilding rely upon the coverage you have. Living in a community means there are two types of insurance that homeowners should worry about: association insurance and individual insurance on the unit. Let’s take a closer look at “who covers what” when it comes to insurance coverage within an association.

What is a Master Policy?

Living in an apartment complex, condominium unit, or townhouse potentially means that you are part of an association otherwise known as a homeowners association or HOA. Many HOAs carry what’s known as a “master policy.” Generally, the Master Policy has “walls-out” coverage for all units in the building.

What is Covered Under a Walls-Out Master Policy?

This type of policy typically provides coverage for both physical damage and personal injuries. Items that are usually covered in an insurance policy of this kind may include damage to the parts of the property shared by all owners, such as roofs, common walls, lobbies or atriums, stairways, elevators, basements, fitness centers and pools, ponds or lakes, playgrounds, and clubhouses. The damage could be caused by Mother Nature, vandals, theft, or even homeowners who have experienced an accident. The governing documents of your specific HOA should state exactly which areas the HOA master policy insures.

Personal injuries that occur in the common areas and amenity areas are also usually covered under the master policy. For example, if someone slips and falls in the pool area or is injured in an elevator, those injuries would be most likely covered under the HOA master policy.

What Should Individuals Insure for their Units?

Individual homeowners need to insure only their own unit. While the master insurance covers the basic building(s) such as walls, roof, floors, and elevators, it leaves to the unit owner the responsibility of insurance appliances, carpeting, cabinets, wall coverings, and other items in the unit. Individual insurance should also cover personal property including clothing, jewelry, electronics, and upgrades you’ve made to your unit.

Using the same company that insures the master policy for your HOA as your individual insurance for your unit may have some advantages in that the company will easily be able to spot gaps in insurance. If you are not using the same company, you and your insurance specialist will want to take 

a close look and consider what is left out or what not to buy duplicate coverage for.

Do you have questions about what is covered and by whom? Call Thayer Associates at 617.354.6480 or visit our website.

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