Category Archives: property management

The Worry of Water Damage in Your Condo

New England has its fair share of wet weather to deal with, from rainstorms in the spring, summer, and fall, to ice storms and mounds of snow in the winter. Add in issues of frozen pipes, aerial flooding, coastal flooding, and water/sewer backups, and “Earth’s most abundant resource” (water) can quickly become a huge problem. Water damage is a common and tricky issue that homeowners all over our region deal with no matter the season. Let’s take a closer look at the questions to consider when trying to determine where responsibility may lie.

Whether it is a small “drip, drip, drip,” or a larger “gussssh,” the problems related to water damage can be one of the more complex issues when it comes to living within an association. There is often a fine line that determines who is responsible when it comes to water damage. Determining who is liable for the damage means taking into account several factors such as the root cause of the damage, the location, and insurance guidelines. The general rule of thumb for HOA repairs versus homeowner repairs are usually differentiated based on whether the damage is to the exterior of the building or the interior. Unfortunately, many cases of water damage tend to start on the exterior of a building and work their way inward. This makes it difficult to decide where to draw the line. The answer, then, to the complex question is often found within the governing documents of the condominium association.

Questions to Consider:

While it is difficult to discern specifically who would be responsible for what in this blog, there are some questions you will want to consider.

  1. Where in the condominium complex did the water damage occur? For instance, did the leak happen in a common area such as a hallway, stairwell, lounge, or gym? Normally, this would be covered by the HOA.
  2. What was the ultimate cause of the water damage? For example, did your toilet back up or a pipe burst in your condo unit? In that instance, your condo insurance will most likely be the one to contact about repairs, not the HOA. If the water damage is caused by a roof malfunction the HOA would probably be responsible for the outside damage and then determine if interior damage will be the responsibility of your insurance or the association.
  3. What is covered and what is not? Before you buy into a condo association, always ask what may or may not be covered. For example, would water damage be covered from a flood? Who would handle the financial responsibility if a leak originated in another unit and spilled over into yours? What would be the deductible in the case that the leak originated within my unit?

The answer to these questions and who is responsible for water damages is unique to each association. Be sure to review your copy of the master insurance as well as your own condo insurance. Any questions? Contact Thayer & Associates, Inc., AMO at 617.354.6480 or visit our website.

 

Pets and Service Animals within your Association

If you have a pet, you know that they are, “one of the family” in many ways. Nothing compares to coming home to a loyal companion who can bring comfort, security and, of course, unconditional love. But what if you live in a condominium that is run by a homeowners association (HOA)? Their job is to create pet policies that will benefit the group as a whole. Let’s take a closer look at what issues you may be dealing with in your HOA when it comes to common household pets as well as service animals.

Common Household Pets:

A typical homeowners association and the property management team that handles the maintenance, financing, and insurance for your place of residence will usually have a pet policy in place that will guide owners. The policies usually include rules that address:

  • The type and number of pets allowed in an association.
  • The size and breed allowances of each pet.
  • Guidelines on pets being spayed or neutered.
  • Guidelines on pets being up-to-date on all vaccinations and health exams.
  • Rules for outside areas that can be used and guidelines for picking up and disposing of pet waste.
  • Requirements that pets be on-leash while outdoors and meet all municipal rules and regulations.

In addition to these considerations, management will have guidelines on what to do if a pet causes damage, excessive noise or becomes a nuisance to other pets or condo owners. There will probably also be rules about pet identification and registration of new pets within the association.

Service Animals:

There are other considerations when it comes to service animals: pets that work, provide assistance, or perform tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability. Under the Federal Fair Housing Act (FHA), a disabled person may use or seek to use an assistance animal in housing where the provider (the association) forbids residents from having pets or otherwise imposes restriction or conditions relating to pets and other animals.

Recently, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development issued a memo about when it comes to the question of a service animal. Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, the regulations narrow the definition of service animal specifically to dogs.  “Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not service animals.” Additionally, the definition of “service animal” excludes emotional support animals.

Creating a pet policy that is fair to all who live within the association is fairly straightforward and requires making rules that are fair and enforceable. Legal assistance may be necessary when making accommodations for homeowners who wish to apply for a service animal exception.

 

Resources:

The Human Society Guidelines for Pets in HoAs

Federal Fair Housing Act (FHA)

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Are You a Good Neighbor?

Living in an association, whether it is a co-op or a condominium association, can be wonderful as there are usually many shared amenities like pools, tennis courts, walking paths, and community clubhouses where unit owners can schedule gatherings. There are also seasonal advantages such as always having landscaping that is well manicured and walkways and parking lots are plowed and treated when the snow storms hit. The benefits of living in a community far outweigh the occasional nuisance behaviors that can pop up when people live in close proximity to their neighbors. That is why we have put together this guide, and continue to post on our social media, ways that you can be a “good neighbor.”

Reduce Excessive Noise

Common hallways, amenity areas, and parking lots can seem like areas where you can talk louder than normal or, if you have children, let them run around and play a bit. Try to be sensitive about your noise level and at what hour you are making the noise.

Use Common Areas Responsibly

If you share a laundry facility, hallway, pool deck, or even an outdoor seating area, be especially respectful when using the facility. That means pick up after yourself, use the furnishings carefully, and treat equipment knowing that others will want to use it after you.

Take Care of Your Trash

While it might be tempting to put your trash outside the door of your unit, in order to remember to bring it out later, it could become a problem. The smell or sight of your lingering trash bag could be a nuisance to your neighbors. In general, it is a good idea to put the filled trash bags into the trash bins immediately for health and pest control reasons.

Park Respectfully

We know that New England in the winter can mean snow-covered lots. But whenever possible, park in the right spot and allow for space for your neighboring cars to get in and out easily. If you have guests visiting, remind them of the proper places to park their cars.

Clean Up After Your Pets

If you live in an association where pets are allowed, be sure to pick up after your dog. Keep your pet on a leash and encourage good behavior by not allowing him/her to jump on neighbors or bark excessively.

Being a good neighbor is easy if you follow the golden rule of treating others as you would like to be treated. Here at Thayer Associates, we handle many aspects of being a good neighbor with our property management. From online association services to community building services, we offer a host of ways to make your living community happy, safe, and well maintained. If you are searching for a property management team, contact Thayer & Associates, Inc., AMO at 617.354.6480 or visit our website.