Category Archives: good neighbor

The Hatfields and the McCoys: Diplomacy is Best in a Time of Conflict

The names Hatfield and McCoy are synonymous with feuding clans that dates back to the time of the Civil War. It was believed that the McCoys were Unionists and the Hatfields were Confederates with obvious opposing views. These American Appalachian mountaineer families carried on a legendary feud that has made its place history so much so that whenever there is a conflict, even in today’s society, the names are still mentioned. 

What Should I do If I am Involved in a Conflict? 

Solving conflicts may not be the easiest situation to deal with but there are usually guidelines that your homeowners association (HOA) can follow in order to resolve the conflict before it becomes a Hatfield vs. McCoy situation. 

After an event or dispute, the first thing that happens when one of the parties involved wants a conflict resolution is that one person must initiate the dispute resolution process to get the ball rolling. The process is probably laid out in the governing documents under what to do if you have a complaint or want to resolve a dispute. A written request will trigger the process. It is common for a member of the association and any owners involved in a dispute to be identified as the parties that will be actively participating in dispute resolution.

After the written request for a meeting, it is common that both parties come together to voice their concerns and their hopes to find a remedy to the situation. The location of the discussion is usually a quiet, neutral location where issues can be talked about at length and with the governing rules in mind. The ultimate hope is that the two parties will come to an agreement and resolve the issue or issues during the meeting. 

What if a Resolution is Not Found? 

If the meeting does not seem to solve the issue, then usually a third party will be requested to mediate the conflict. The third party must be neutral and able to present a resolution that takes the concerns of both sides into consideration. This resolution will be put into writing at the conclusion of the meeting.

This all sounds plain and simple, doesn’t it? Well, when emotions are involved nothing is so simple. That is why it is so important for HOAs to have a solid and experienced executive board that can come together and mediate these events. If you find that conflicts are not being met head-on in your community, then you may want to suggest a conflict resolution meeting or a mediator to resolve the situation. 

Importance of Year-Round Property Maintenance

One of the biggest perks of living in an association is not having to deal with the general property maintenance that individual homeowners deal with. Think about all that time that has been freed up since you don’t need to think about all that upkeep and regular care. As a part of a community, the HOA (and your monthly dues) usually takes care of each season’s specific tasks. It is important to have the regular care of a property maintenance crew to handle what Mother Nature hands us each season here in New England. 

Top-notch, maintenance can help create a positive first impression, keep the area clean and tidy, allows for the safety of residents, and allows for unit owner’s satisfaction that they are living in a well-cared-for area. 

Every season brings with it new areas and equipment that should be inspected, cleaned, repaired, or replaced. Here is a guide to what your property maintenance team may look out for the association in your community. 

Fall and Winter 

The fall season is one of the busiest times of year when it comes to maintenance needs. In order to prepare for the winter season, much of the building and grounds must be surveyed for possible hazards. For example, all gutters and overhanging branches should be cleaned out and trimmed back respectively. Outdoor pools should be closed and locked down for the season. Outdoor patio equipment should be cleaned and stored until spring. Final plans for snow removal should be completed at this time, whether it is hiring an independent contractor or using the maintenance crew at the association. Make sure you have all those ducks in a row. 

During the winter, the pipes should be examined in common areas to be sure there is no possibility that they will freeze as the temperatures dip even further. One of the main jobs of maintenance during the winter months is watching the weather carefully to be sure that all walkways, driveways, and roads within the community are cleared and safe for residents to use. 

Spring and Summer 

And just like that, winter disappears and maintenance crews are no longer worrying about road salt and shoveling, but rather about planting and landscaping the community so that it has a first-class curb appeal. 

Spring and summer is the time to take inventory of repairs that need to be done after the winter ravaged roofs and other areas of the community. Pavement may need repairing after the salts and plows created cracks or holes. In addition, summer is the time to tackle major renovation projects that will need nice weather and time to complete. 

Maintenance is a year-round job that allows for the smooth running of any association and community. Learn more from HOA Leader online about the maintenance you hope to support in your community. 

 

Ready to Move into a Community with an HOA? 

Are you thinking about packing it all up and moving to a community that has an HOA? Communities that have a Homeowners Association have a ton of advantages including the amenities, freedom from landscaping the lawn every weekend, and being in a secure environment. If you are new to community living, you will want to be aware of some aspects that come with this type of community. Here are some of our tips for your move. 

Understand the Rules of Your Community 

Living in a community is different than owning your own property or home. It is important to note that there are rules and bylaws that govern each community. You will want to ask specific questions when considering a move to see if you and your lifestyle are a good fit. For example, ask about rules concerning pets, smoking, parking, guests in the amenities areas, noise restrictions, rules on renovations, and the list could go on and on. Carefully read all Governing Documents before you decide on purchasing in a community. 

Understand the Insurance Differences

You probably already know that there is a master insurance that covers all exterior aspects of your building and common areas in your community. But what you may not realize is that you must also have individual insurance to protect the items within your own unit. Be sure to talk to your agent so there are no gaps in coverage. 

View the HOA Budget

Where a community spends its money can tell you a lot about what is valued. Ask to see the budget, which should be available from any HOA Board members. Look to see how often maintenance is completed on common areas, amenities, the roof, exterior structures, painting, landscaping, and paving the parking areas. 

Engage with the Community 

Ask about community events, how the pool or gym works, and find out if there is an association email that you can get your name on so that once you move in you will begin feeling like you are a part of the community. 

Know Who to Contact 

Unlike owning your own home, when there is a problem you will need to know who to contact. Get a list of board members as well as a contact person who can tell you whether you are responsible for calling a repair person or whether the association will deal with it. Usually, if the problem occurs in your unit you are responsible, while outside it is the responsibility of the association. However, there are questionable times like if there is a roof leak, water pipe burst, electrical problem and so on. 

Are you preparing for a move to an association? Here are a few sites to examine when dealing with a move that can help you out. Good luck and welcome to your new community! 

 

Protecting Association Data from Cyber Crimes

In our last blog we examined the physical security needs of homeowners associations and how screening, communication, surveillance, and access limitations can bring peace of mind to homeowners. This week, we are looking at some of the steps an HOA and Condo associations can protect their communities from cyber crimes.

Think about all the information that a condo association has at its fingertips. The data kept for Board of Director purposes and billing purposes may include each homeowner’s name, address, phone number, email, bank check routing number, tax information, credit card number, and probably social security number.

Given the scope and depth of the data that a homeowners association has, it would stand to reason that there would be many layers of security to protect that data. Unfortunately, many HOAs do not have the resources to protect sensitive data as they should.

Knowing that defenses may be down in a small business like an HOA, hackers have been known to attack in some common ways. Here are a few questions to consider when arranging your HOA cybersecurity measures.

Who should have access to the data?

Cyber experts believe that HOA boards should determine exactly who can gain access to sensitive data and who will not be given access. Keep the list of people who will have access to only those who will need it to deal with finances and condo owner issues. In addition, HOAs should limit where the data can be accessed. Unfortunately, an association’s odds of falling victim to a successful data breach increase every time someone downloads association information and stores it on their personal computer.

 

Is there an IT consultant who can help?

Every HOA should have an expert they can call upon when there are questions about things like firewalls, dual authentication, passwords, backups, and how to maintain security for the HOA server. An HOA can hire IT experts on a full-time basis, or as contractors. This person can train personnel as to what to look for in suspect or malicious emails, viruses, and security breaches.

 

What type of cyber insurance does your HOA have?

Board members for your HOA should routinely check with their condo insurance broker about the community’s potential cyber risks and what type of cyber insurance coverage may be appropriate for your association. Known also as cyber liability, cyber risk, or data breach insurance, this type of liability insurance protects the HOA in the event of data breaches, viruses, network attacks, computer theft, and other losses or compromises of the HOA’s computers, network, or websites.

Cybercriminals only need to see a small vulnerability to make their way into your HOA data. Do you have a strong security protocol for your association? For more information contact Thayer & Associates, Inc., AMO at 617.354.6480 or visit our website.

 

How Secure Is Your Homeowners Community?

New England, and Boston in particular, is a pretty safe place to call home. Unfortunately, no community is immune to crime. Burglars are always looking for vulnerabilities and cracks in security systems to infiltrate and take advantage. This is true in single-family residences, apartments, and condos as well. Security, therefore, is one of the main tasks of a solid homeowners association.

If you live in a condo in the Boston area or in the surrounding communities, how secure do you feel your condo association is? Do you feel safe walking at night, visiting common areas, or navigating the parking lot? These are all things that can point to good security within an association. Let’s take a closer look at some of the security protocols your association can and should be maintaining for the safety of all who live in your community.

 

Smoke, Fire, and CO

It is imperative that an association understand and maintain these three security practices when designing and building a condo complex. It is the board’s duty to maintain, repair, and replace common area security for smoke, fire, and carbon monoxide detection. Compliance for these fundamental security steps is mandated both locally and federally.

Screening Vendors

Most condo associations have common areas that are maintained by outside vendors. For example, vendors are used to maintain elevators, landscaping, pools, gyms, and gardens, as well as to paint, and repair the exterior areas. HOAs should regularly screen the vendors to make sure they have the proper permitting, licensing, and insurance. Many HOAs make it a policy to inform owners when a vendor will be on the property and for what reason. This screening and communication can give owners a sense of security when they find repair personnel around the grounds of their building.

 

Access and Surveillance

No one likes a security camera watching them at every turn, but they are a big deterrent for criminals who do not want to see their crime on the nightly news or social media. Surveillance cameras can be a great deterrent in both interior and exterior common areas. In addition, many HOAs have access keypads that make common areas accessible to only community members. Include well-lit walkways, driveways, and ancillary parking lots and condo owners will have peace of mind when they are at home.

What are some of the security protocols that your association uses? What protocols do you feel are missing. Join in the conversation in the comments below. The next blog will take a closer look at digital security for association data. If you have questions about security in your HOA, call Thayer & Associates, Inc., AMO at 617.354.6480 or visit our website.

 

Selling Your Condo? Learn How Paint Can Help!

Looking to sell your condo and want to get the best price possible without breaking the bank on improvements? Paint may be just the trick that can help you sell fast and for the price you want.

According to online real estate listings like Zillow, there are 920 condos for sale in and around Boston (as of this writing). With the median price of single home properties has increased by 44% in the past five years, many young people are hoping to step into the real estate market through a condominium purchase.

This is good news for Bostonians hoping to sell. However, there are still some things that you can do to help make your condo stand out from the rest when potential buyers come for an open house. If renovating your kitchen or bath is not in the cards due to budget or time, then paint may be a great option to make your condo look and feel fresh and new.

Painting is one of the less expensive and most impactful improvements you can make as you prepare your condo to sell. Here is why:

Fresh Paint Gives Positive First Impressions

A fresh coat of paint can be a positive first impression to house hunters. The largest square space of any home are the walls and ceilings. If there are chips, stains, scuff marks, or peeling paint, the potential buyer could be turned off. A new coat of paint can give a room a new look that appeals to many buyers. Making a good first impression is important since most buyers make up their minds within the first few minutes if they are even going to consider your condo a potential option.

Fresh Paint Means A Well Maintained Home

Paint has a way of conveying a message to potential buyers that the home is well maintained if it shows no signs of wear-and-tear. Buyers like to know that the interior of a condo has been properly cared for and well-painted walls, ceilings, and trim communicate that message clearly.

Proper Colors Let in Natural Light

House hunters today are looking for light and airy spaces to call their own. Even if your condo is not especially light-filled or airy, paint can help make it feel that way. Choosing light or neutral colors can lighten up a space, and make it feel more open. Cover up dark paints that can close in a room or make it feel dated or small.

Paint Appeals to a Wide Range of Tastes

In order to make your house appeal to a large number of potential homebuyers, painting interior walls with neutral paint colors is advisable. Neutral colors like white, beige, tan, and cream provide a blank canvas for homebuyers. Try not to pick a color that is trendy, or may be off-putting to certain groups. Outdated paint colors negatively affect the overall appeal of your real estate property, so a new coat of paint modernizes and updates your home.

While it is hard to estimate the return on your investment when it comes to painting, realtors do agree that it is worth the time, effort, and cost to have a fresh coat of paint on the interior of your condo before placing that for sale ad. Check with your association and your realtor before beginning any improvements so you can make the most of your budget and efforts.

Are You a Good Neighbor?

Living in an association, whether it is a co-op or a condominium association, can be wonderful as there are usually many shared amenities like pools, tennis courts, walking paths, and community clubhouses where unit owners can schedule gatherings. There are also seasonal advantages such as always having landscaping that is well manicured and walkways and parking lots are plowed and treated when the snow storms hit. The benefits of living in a community far outweigh the occasional nuisance behaviors that can pop up when people live in close proximity to their neighbors. That is why we have put together this guide, and continue to post on our social media, ways that you can be a “good neighbor.”

Reduce Excessive Noise

Common hallways, amenity areas, and parking lots can seem like areas where you can talk louder than normal or, if you have children, let them run around and play a bit. Try to be sensitive about your noise level and at what hour you are making the noise.

Use Common Areas Responsibly

If you share a laundry facility, hallway, pool deck, or even an outdoor seating area, be especially respectful when using the facility. That means pick up after yourself, use the furnishings carefully, and treat equipment knowing that others will want to use it after you.

Take Care of Your Trash

While it might be tempting to put your trash outside the door of your unit, in order to remember to bring it out later, it could become a problem. The smell or sight of your lingering trash bag could be a nuisance to your neighbors. In general, it is a good idea to put the filled trash bags into the trash bins immediately for health and pest control reasons.

Park Respectfully

We know that New England in the winter can mean snow-covered lots. But whenever possible, park in the right spot and allow for space for your neighboring cars to get in and out easily. If you have guests visiting, remind them of the proper places to park their cars.

Clean Up After Your Pets

If you live in an association where pets are allowed, be sure to pick up after your dog. Keep your pet on a leash and encourage good behavior by not allowing him/her to jump on neighbors or bark excessively.

Being a good neighbor is easy if you follow the golden rule of treating others as you would like to be treated. Here at Thayer Associates, we handle many aspects of being a good neighbor with our property management. From online association services to community building services, we offer a host of ways to make your living community happy, safe, and well maintained. If you are searching for a property management team, contact Thayer & Associates, Inc., AMO at 617.354.6480 or visit our website.